Pages: 224
Illustrations: Over 200 colour and black and white illustrations.
Publication Date: 02 June 2016
Words: 75000

The Cambridge Phenomenon: Global Impact

Foreword by Martin Rees

Hardback
9781908990617
£50.00
About the book

What do CERN, smartphones, the iridium satellite network, the most popular app stores in the world, the biggest online game in the world, Moscow drivers, Seniors golfer Tony Johnstone, sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis and anyone who has their DNA sequenced have in common? They all rely on innovations that have come out of the technology cluster known as the Cambridge Phenomenon. This book, a follow-up to The Cambridge Phenomenon: 50 Years of Innovation and Enterprise, showcases what the Cambridge technology cluster has done for the world. The Cambridge Phenomenon: Global Impact reveals just how many of us, all around the globe, rely on Cambridge technology every day.

This book tells the important, hidden story of how academic excellence and entrepreneurial endeavour have improved people's lives the world over. It is crucial reading for anybody interested in the ways successful businesses work, and the fundamental role of our great educational institutions in fostering that success.

Additional Information

Pages 224
Illustrations Over 200 colour and black and white illustrations.
Publication Date 2 Jun 2016
Words 75000
About the Author

Kate Kirk has been a freelance editor, writer and public relations consultant for more than 20 years. Her clients include the Cambridge Enterprise Conference, the World Bank and the World Health Organization. She has written books and articles on everything from hot-air ballooning to data modelling and risk assessment for financial institutions.

Charles Cotton has been part of the Cambridge technology scene since he came to the city in the 1980s to work for inventor and entrepreneur Clive Sinclair. Since then he has taken technology companies public on the London Stock Exchange and NASDAQ, and been appointed Director of numerous organisations in the academic and business sectors. In 2009 he set up what is now known as Cambridge Phenomenon International to promote the Cambridge technology cluster.